Ngayulu manta pampura kulinu tjukurpa ngayuku tjiti munu tjamu kami

Produced with Tjala Arts for Third Coast Festival Competition 2019

Nyurpaya Kaika Burton was born deep in the desert of Central Australia. Her mother travelled hundreds of miles barefoot before giving birth alone at a massive desert mesa called Atila - a place which became her spiritual country.

This International Year of Indigenous Languages, at the age of 70, Nyurpaya decided to share the deeply personal story of her birth in her traditional language Pitjantjatjara, describing the traditional birthing methods that have helped define her cultural life.

The soundscape is binaural, specifically recorded on the country of Nyurpaya’s birth, in one of the most remote parts of Australia.

 

This piece is best experienced through headphones. You can also listen while reading the English translation.

Meditating in language

From pop-up to deep dive: teaching is a sacred thing

Awaye, ABC Radio National

In a bid to improve community wellbeing, traditional healers in Central Australia - ngangkari - have developed a new set of meditations, the first of their kind, featuring the voices of Pitjantjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra speakers from the APY Lands in the north of South Australia.

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From cattle the carbon

Awaye, ABC Radio National

 

Language is bringing people together in a repurposed shed at the back of the old op shop off Todd Mall in Alice Springs. What started as a pop-up last year, Apmere angkentye-kenhe - or 'place for language', reopened this year and is changing the way people think about the local language Arrernte, and about each other.

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Champion of the poddy ride

Background Breifing, ABC Radio National

 

Once a cattle empire, Henbury Station in Central Australia was the home of a multi-million dollar, carbon farming experiment. But with the cattle gone the neighbours are angry, and while the government says restoring land can be a good business, this taxpayer assisted project didn't quite go to plan. This investigative documentary produced with Di Martin explored the shift from cattle to carbon.

Related

 

ABC Rural, Bush Telegraph, Radio National

He'd set his sights on victory an nothing was going to hold him back. 11-year old Ryan Fogarty from Anningie station went to the Harts Range rodeo in 2011 determined to become the poddy ride champion. His spirit and enthusiasm carried this award-winning radio story to programs across Australia.

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After the cloud falls

Chasing camels on country

ABC Rural, Bush Telegraph, Radio National

 

British atomic bomb testing was conducted at Maralinga in South Australia between 1956 into the early 1960s. But it's only more recent decades that stories have emerged about what happened to the people living near the site. One of those stories is Yami Lester's, a Yankunytjatjara man, who was only 10-years-old when the testing began.

Related

 

ABC Rural, Bush Telegraph, Radio National

 

One chopper and five four-wheel drives sent 70 feral camels stampeding into temporary yards, deep in the heart of the Haasts Bluff Aboriginal Land Trust in the Northern Territory. Join Indigenous rangers on their first-ever muster of feral camels on their own land in the Northern Territory.

Related

Why the Future Belongs to the Potato

Bush Telegraph, Radio National

 

The lowly spud may seem like the most humble of foods, but it built the glittering empire of the Incas, and it may yet secure the future for billions of people across the globe. Thanks to a Crawford Fellowship, I travelled to Peru to meet the traditional potato farmers playing a big part in one of the world's most unusual food projects.

Related

 

Plenty Pathways

ABC Rural, PM, Bush Telegraph, Radio National

 

A local teacher and principal takes matters into her own hands, starting a program to engage young Indigenous men from remote parts of the NT, training them to be stockmen. So pack your lunch and get on the bus, as this short radio documentary takes you along with the students for a days work.

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Tuyu triumphant at Tiwi

ABC Darwin, Bush Telegraph, Radio National

 

Not even transport troubles and a cyclone threat could put a dampener on Tiwi Islands grand final day. In 2014, I travelled to the Tiwi Islands for ABC Darwin to cover the match and discovered that the Tiwis love their football and they're not afraid to show it.

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video

Giles: Australia's Most Remote Weather Station

It's the most remote weather station on the continent.

The Giles Weather Station is 750 kilometres west of Alice Springs in Western Australia. Before becoming part of the Bureau of Meteorology's network of weather stations, Giles was used to support weapons testing from Maralinga and Woomera in the 1950s and '60s. Now, it's the only weather radar for 2.5 million square kilometres of outback Australia. Each morning at 8.45am, observers from weather stations around the world simultaneously launch a daily weather balloon. And at Giles that can mean braving the hot desert conditions, not to mention the flies.

Filmed at the Giles Weather Station in 2013 with Brendan Phelan for ABC Rural.

 

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Rob Cook's Tanami journey

In 2011, Northern Territory cattleman Rob Cook made history driving his powered wheelchair through the Tanami Desert from Suplejack Station to Alice Springs, over 700 kilometres. Rob was left a quadriplegic after a mustering helicopter accident in 2008. To raise awareness of and funds to support his disability, ROb and his childhood friend Luke became the first person to cross the Tanami Desert in a powered chair.


Filmed with Carl Curtain for ABC Rural in the Tanami Desert, 2011

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